Pressure-time and Flow-time Graphs

Idealized pressure–time and flow–time graphs for mechanical ventilation. Note that the plateau pressure can be measured when flow returns to zero.

PIP peak inspiratory pressure, Pplat plateau pressure

Capture.JPG

 

Trigger and cycle variables for each of the most common types of conventional mechanical ventilation

Capture.JPG

 

Idealized pressure–time and flow–time graphs with PEEP set above zero for volume-controlled modes of ventilation

Capture.JPG

Idealized pressure–time and flow–time graphs with PEEP set above zero for pressure-controlled modes of ventilation

Capture.JPG

 

Idealized pressure–time graph for controlled mandatory ventilation (CMV) with PEEP set above zero. In this mode of ventilation, each breath is triggered after a specified time has elapsed. The breaths can be delivered in either volume controlled (shown) or pressure controlled (not shown), depending on the ventilator settings

Capture

Idealized pressure–time graph for assist control ventilation (ACV) with PEEP set above zero. In this mode of ventilation, each breath is triggered either due to patient initiation (asterisks) or after a specified time has elapsed (no asterisks). The breaths in ACV can be delivered in either volume controlled (shown) or pressure controlled (not shown), depending on the ventilator settings

Capture.JPG

 

Idealized pressure–time graph for intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV) with PEEP set above zero. In this mode of ventilation, each set breath is triggered after a specified time has elapsed. In addition, the patient can breathe spontaneously between these machine- triggered breaths. The spontaneous breaths create a small relative negative pressure that are depicted in this graph and noted with asterisks. The machine-triggered breaths in IMV can be delivered in either volume controlled (shown) or pressure controlled (not shown), depending on the ventilator settings

Capture.JPG

Idealized pressure–time graph for synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) with PEEP set above zero. In this mode of ventilation, each set breath (or mandatory breath) is synchronized to a patient trigger after a specified time has elapsed. In addition, the patient can breathe spontaneously between the mandatory breaths. The spontaneous breaths create a small relative negative pressure that are depicted in this graph and noted with asterisks. The mandatory breaths in SIMV can be delivered in either volume controlled (shown) or pressure controlled (not shown), depending on the ventilator settings

Capture.JPG

Idealized pressure–time graph for synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) with PEEP set above zero. In addition, pressure support is being applied to the additional patient-initiated breaths between the mandatory breaths

Capture.JPG

Idealized pressure–time graph for pressure support ventilation (PSV) with PEEP set above zero. In this mode of ventilation, each breath is triggered by the patient

 

Capture

 

Reference:

Layon, A. Joseph, Andrea Gabrielli, and William Friedman. Textbook Of Neurointensive Care. London: Springer London, 2013. Print.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Tagged: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: